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Dear Justin Cronin – What Will I Do Now That Your Trilogy is Over?

Dear Mr. Cronin:

I’m writing you to inform you that I have finished your trilogy that begun with The Passage, continued with The Twelve and that has culminated with The City of Mirrors.  I want to thank you for providing me with such an emotional punch of a journey these last few years.  Thank you for the characters, the anxiety, the heartache and the fist pumps in the air.  I will forever cherish this series and how much your storytelling drew me in.

But Mr. Cronin, I have a problem.

What the hell am I supposed to do now? I have laid the book down, the last page read and I’m staring around me wondering how I’m supposed to live my life now that this series is over.

So I’m asking you for your assistance in helping me figure out my life because really, this is your fault.  I was fine but then Amy, Peter, Michael, Alicia, Hollis and Sara happened. Damn you for creating such great characters.  Characters that are strong, visible, fully formed, that seemed so real.  And now that they are gone…I’m left bereft. I’m an empty husk needing to be filled.

Help me.  What do I do now?

Should I take up knitting?  Cooking lessons?

I do have cats, I suppose I could continue giving them attention.  Also, my friends haven’t seen me since I started The City of Mirrors so I probably should let them know I’m okay. It’s been a pretty nice summer here in Winnipeg too so maybe I should go outside?  It’s been awhile since I’ve seen the sun, should I put sunscreen on?

My garbage is piling up – should I take that out now?  I also haven’t eaten since I started the final book – that could be why I feel so weak and why I’m rather emotional right now.

There’s dust bunnies the size of virals in my living room so I guess I can clean.  But as I’ve mentioned, I haven’t eaten for awhile so the whole being weak thing kinda gets in the way.  Any recipes you suggest that are simple and quick? Also…sleep.  I haven’t slept since I picked City of Mirrors up so that sounds like a nice idea hey?

And probably my husband might be open to spending time with me again.  If he’s still around.  I think I’m still married.  Who knows, I’ve been pretty preoccupied with your book.  Man, if I’m not married anymore I’m going to be really upset with you Mr. Cronin, I liked having that husband guy around.

Mr. Cronin, it’s a damned good thing I don’t have kids because – wow – I have no idea what state they would be in if I did.

As you can see, I need some direction here. I’m feeling quite like the girl from nowhere right now so any suggestions, advice or firm reality checks would be great.

I would appreciate your attention to this matter immediately.

Thank you for your time Mr. Cronin.

(And thank you for the stories.)

Sincerely,

A Book Lover

 

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Five Rules of Fellowship (the Questing Kind)

We’ve read ’em, we love ’em, we want more of ’em.  Those books where a rag-tag group of people journey with each other towards a destination, a quest, a mission – an adventure.  These are my favourite kind because we are treated to – not only an epic adventure – but a view of relationships, evolution of mind, heart and spirit and sacrifices made when we enter into these types of stories.  I call these Fellowship stories because they always contain a group of three or more people travelling together towards a goal.  We all are familiar with the Lord of the Rings – probably the most well-known Fellowship story of all. As I’ve read these types of books over the years, I’ve come to notice 5 unspoken rules about Fellowship stories.  But before we get into them, what do I mean by fellowship?

Fellowship is defined as:

1. the state of sharing mutual interests, experiences, activities, etc

So in the case of these stories, the mutual interest is a focused goal, usually to save the world, destroy the one ring, defeat evil, fight zombies, find a cure,  and so on.  The mutual experiences and activities are the challenges the group faces on their journey.  I haven’t met a single person who doesn’t love the Fellowship type stories, whether they be a movie or a book.  It is compelling to witness how a group stays strong or dissolves due to circumstances outside of their control.  We see the true nature of character in group dynamics; who is lacking courage, who has malice in their heart, who is loyal, loving and brave.  I am drawn to these types of stories (as I am sure we all are) because let’s face it, we are drawn to each other – we humans need each other.  As an introvert I revel in solitude – but only for so long.  Eventually I will seek human companionship.  We create fellowships for ourselves without our even knowing it – our group of friends/family who we spend the most time with.  We recognize ourselves in these stories, relating to one or two characters within.  Who we cheer for, who we mistrust, who we miss when they are gone from the story can reveal something of our inner selves.

Let’s dive in to the five rules shall we?

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The Five Rules of Fellowship:

  1. There must always be a group of three or more people
    • It can start out as one or two but eventually, a group of three or more is formed along the way
  2. There must be a journey with a mission involved 
    • the journey has to be a physical one towards a destination (with the added bonus of an emotional and spiritual journey developing along the way)
    • the mission usually involves saving the world, kingdom, city, country, another being or soul
  3. The group gets separated along the way 
    • either by choice or by force
    • it can be the entire group splitting or it might just be one or two people who leave the group
  4. Someone in the group eventually (*usually) betrays another 
    • betrays the whole group or an individual
    • this betrayal might be forced (blackmailed or seduced by power)
    • betrayal might also by by choice (they put themselves before the group to save their own ass)
    • * I say usually because not every Fellowship story has a betrayal – though most do
  5. Someone in the group will eventually sacrifice themselves for the group
    • it could be the betrayer who redeems themselves in the end with an unselfish act
    • the sacrifice is usually made so the rest of the group can be saved to finish their journey

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These are the 5 rules I’ve observed that are standard throughout each story.  Is there a rule you have observed that I haven’t listed?  If so, I would love to know.  Write it down in the comment section below.

To end this post I want to list the books of an author who writes a lot of Fellowship stories.  Stephen King.  He loves them and I love him for loving them.  His Fellowship stories are:

  • IT
  • The Cell
  • The Stand
  • Stand by Me
  • The Mist

Other Fellowship stories I’ve read that follow the above rules?

  • The Passage Trilogy – Justin Cronin
  • Dies the Fire – S.M. Stirling
  • Swan Song – Robert McCammon
  • The Wizard of Oz – L. Frank Baum
  • The Hobbit – J.R.R. Tolkien
  • The Chronicles of Narnia – C.S. Lewis
  • The Walking Dead (graphic novels) – Robert Kirkman
  • The Braided Path – Chris Wooding
  • A Song of Ice and Fire series – George R.R. Martin
  • Tigana – Guy Gavriel Kay
  • The Last Unicorn – Peter S. Beagle
  • Fire of Heaven Trilogy – Russell Kirkpatrick

I know I’ve read many throughout the years and can’t remember them all – but these are the ones that stick out in my head. What Fellowship stories have you read?  I would love to know so I can add them to my To Read list.

 

This post brought to you by the letter F and the A to Z Challenge.

The Passage by Justin Cronin

the passage by justin croninLet me get my gushing out of the way – I LOVED this book.

The Passage by Justin Cronin has everything a good apocalyptic story should have:

  • Compelling, unique apocalyptic concept
  • Characters you fall in love with
  • Grappling with issues of the humane and inhumane
  • Great villains that you love to hate
  • Philosophical, dramatic and emotional tone

The compelling, unique concept steps away from zombies in this character driven story and instead focuses on the devastating effects of military testing on humans.  With the hopes of creating human weapons we instead are treated to a world where hell has been unleashed on the population through the creation of the Twelve.  The Twelve are former humans who have been transformed into vampire-like beings and with every attack they transform other humans into an army of apocalyptic proportions – virals.

What I liked about this book is that it didn’t spend too much time on the creation of the virals – just enough to whet your appetite.  We are also introduced to Amy (a mysterious little girl who seems to simultaneously hold potential answers to what the virals are and raises more questions) and Wolgast, the man who has sworn to protect her (let me take this moment to say the relationship between Amy and Wolgast is beautifully written).

Suddenly we are launched about a hundred years into the future where we are introduced to a colony of people who are living in a world that seems – empty.  The virals have devastated the world and this group of people must survive the darkness, the fear and the violence that the virals can inflict.

And then Amy appears – still the little girl she was a hundred years previous.

I don’t want to reveal any more of the story because it is worth the read – a philosophical, spiritual and action-oriented story all in one.  Justin Cronin does an excellent job of creating multidimensional, emotional characters that are magnetic – so much so that when you aren’t reading about them, you are thinking about them, wondering when they are going to appear again.  As a reader you journey with a group of people from the colony who are forced to travel miles and miles to find answers, to find hope – led by Amy.

It is a beautiful story about relationships and what we will do for the people we love.  It is about the connections of family and that when faced with destruction, family isn’t defined by the blood you share, but by who you will lay your life down for.

It also asks a question that we should all be asking ourselves on a daily basis: what are the consequences of messing with nature?  Of playing God? In our quest for power – whether it is through science or technology – we are moving further and further away from what it is to be human.  This is what is scary about this story.  That there are people “in power” that are making decisions that could go horribly wrong and that it is the rest of the world that will pay.  Science in itself is not bad, it becomes bad when the intentions behind the science are tainted by the hunger for power.

There is a fine balance with apocalyptic stories.  On one hand you can’t have a story that is too depressing.  As a reader, you need to feel there is hope (never mind as a reader, as a human!).  Too much violence and gore and it is meaningless.  The characters are a fine balance to strike as well.  It is easy to fall into stereotypical caricatures in the apocalyptic landscape – the leader, the nerd, the hysterical woman, the asshole.  There are no stereotypes in The Passage.  All characters – even the virals – have more to them than meets the eye.  They express fear, doubt, love, courage and despair all in different ways and at different times.  There are men and women alike in this story who are heroes and warriors at different times throughout.

I wish that I could read this story for the first time again.  As I read I was delighted to discover a refreshing, impactful and philosophical, apocalyptic horror story that isn’t so much about the horror as it is about the characters.

The Passage is one of three books and while I’m sad that I have to wait a year for the third (I’ve just finished the second book, The Twelve, which I will be reviewing shortly) this story is one that I wish could go on and on (a la The Walking Dead).

If you are a fan of apocalyptic stories you won’t find a better one than this.

My rating:

OMG! I LOVE THIS BOOK!My heart hurtsGod save my soulDevastatedThis book totally gets me

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